What is the signature sound of Dublin city?

News, Uncategorized

Thanks to Jim Carroll for the Mapping Popular Music in Dublin write up in the Irish Times, 10.06.2016.

It’s interesting that he highlighted our findings on the rise of rap and hip hop in Dublin, and how our respondents imagined a connection to narrative forms in Dublin’s popular music traditions (from folk and acoustic guitar-based singer-songwriters into the genres of rap, hip-hop and MC culture).
lethal-dialect

Dublin rapper Lethal Dialect © Dublin2020

Carroll writes, “Few will argue with these findings. The folk tradition in the city has deep roots and it’s only natural that it would have re-emerged in the singer-songwriter world of recent decades. While there may be a wish to present other sounds as the prevailing mood music of the city, people associate Dublin with words and stories and this means singer-songwriters.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Carroll goes on to say that “Mangaoang and O’Flynn (…) highlight the need to support smaller neighbourhood spaces for emerging scenes; more investment in the provision of information about popular music to those engaged in tourism (including the establishment of a “temporary task force” for high-profile shows and events); the extension of venue opening hours; a need to address the gender imbalance in music in the city; and more development of all- age and youth endeavours.”

To read the article in full, go here. Sam Ojo is represented by the Word Up Collective.

screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-14-28-30

 

Advertisements

European Fan Studies Conference, 12-13 November 2015

News

Dr John O‘Flynn, Head of Music at St Patrick’s Campus, and Dr Áine Mangaoang, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Music, St Patrick’s Campus, DCU, were invited to deliver a plenary Expert Session at the interdisciplinary European Fan Cultures Conference, at the Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication, Erasmus University Rotterdam (12-13 November, 2015).

The conference brought together scholars from a wide range of disciplines (including media studies, musicology, sociology, psychology) who are interested in fan cultures and fan studies, and who investigate audiences, media, leisure, tourism, games and celebrities. Organised by Simone Driesson, Leonieke Bolderman, and Abby Waysdorf, the event was supported by the Fan Studies Network.

O’Flynn and Mangaoang’s co-presented talk covered their ongoing research, innovative participatory methodologies, and initial findings from ‘Mapping Popular Music in Dublin’: a 12-month Fáilte Ireland-funded research project that aims to map popular music experience in Dublin from the viewpoint of fans (citizens and tourists), musicians, and music industry personnel.

Click here to read a review of the conference by Dr Nicolle Lamerichs (Maastricht University).

 

 

On The Record

News

Thanks to the Irish Time’s music journalist and critic Jim Carroll for featuring the Mapping Popular Music in Dublin project earlier this week on the On The Record blog (14.07.2015).

Áine cited Jim’s article “Just how many musicians live and work in Dublin” (06.02.2013) in a paper at the recent Society of Musicology Ireland annual plenary conference (12-14.06.2015). For a copy of this presentation, contact Áine at: aine.mangaoang[at]dcu.ie.

Screen Shot 2015-07-19 at 18.00.18